Your Poetry Collection’s been Published – what now?

Getting a poetry collection published isn’t the end of a journey, but a transitionary stage. It marks the transition from writing a book to selling and promoting the book (and starting on the next). It’s not usual for writers to have mixed feelings when they finally get to hold a copy of their book in their hands. It’s a celebration but can also feel disappointing as a poet shifts from one stage in the journey (getting published) to the next stage (promotion) and the promotional stage is a long haul as I’ve previously written about in “Selling Poetry”.

Most poets prefer the first stage of writing a collection: writing and editing the poems, arranging the poems and seeing how they work alongside neighbouring poems, discussions with editors with the goal of publication. Once published, poets learn that:

“Writer writes book” is not news

The gloss of a new, shiny book can soon dull if you bore everyone you meet by talking about it, a little like new parents constantly talking about their new baby and nothing else. Be prepared to talk about the themes you explore in your book, select a particular poem to talk about or the reviews and reactions you’ve had. Vary your story.

Reviews take time

Even if you’ve been able to send out advance copies, reviews won’t necessarily appear on the publication date and may not appear for months afterwards. Check with your publisher before sending out review copies so you don’t send books to the same magazine. Bloggers may be able to review your book quicker, but always ask before sending an unsolicited book for review.

Arrange Readings

Most poetry books are sold at readings so arrange a launch reading and look out for other readings and local festivals you could read at. These are often booked long in advance so it’s best to get in touch with organisers as soon as you know you’re going to be published. Don’t overlook local open mic evenings and events. You may only be able to read one or two poems but you can read directly from your book and may have the opportunity to sell books on the night.

At a launch, you are in control and can talk about your book and read your favourite poems from it. At other readings, focus on reading selected poems rather than talking about your book. It’s the poems that will sell the book, not your brilliant, witty, engaging talk.

Change which poems you read or which order you read them in when doing different readings. If you start to sound bored, your audience may become bored too. There’s no reason not to intersperse poems from your book with newer poems.

Approach local radio stations too, particularly ones that feature talk shows and interviews. If news is a bit slow or a guest drops out, they may invite you in to talk about your book and read a poem. However, don’t turn an interview into an advert. Constantly urging listeners to “buy my book” will encourage them to do the opposite and some non commercial radio stations will drop your interview. If in doubt about what you can say, ask the producer before you go on air.

Social Media

Social media is an indirect way of selling books. It’s more of a networking medium than a selling medium. Don’t become a “buy my book!” bore. Offer information about forthcoming readings, post blog articles on what your book is about, do blog tours featuring articles on a poem or a specific group of poems or article about a topic or issue or theme featured in your book, include links to where your book’s available or post links to reviews.

Make sure you update your profiles to include your new book. If you use an email signature, does it need updating?

Pitfalls

Being asked for Discounts

It will happen. Everyone loves to feel they are getting a bargain or a special offer and there is a minority who think they have to negotiate over everything. Practice saying “no”.

You do not need to offer an explanation for refusing a discount because the person asking will not appreciate that your book took you ages to write, you sweated blood over the comma at the end of stanza two in the title poem or even that writers deserve to be paid for writing. The discount request isn’t personal, haggling is just a habit.

If you know someone’s personal circumstances because they are family or a friend and you’re aware they genuinely can’t afford to pay for a copy of your book but would read it if you gave them a copy, why not consider giving them a copy in return for a review (on a site like Good Reads or Amazon)? That way you are still getting a payment for your book even if it’s not a monetary one.

Be aware that once you allow one person a discount, you will open yourself up to further requests.

Beware Special Offers and Discounts

Offering a time limited special offer or discount, e.g. a discount at a launch reading, a discount on one day only to mark an occasion, is fine. However, if you offer a discount that isn’t time limited, you are effectively devaluing your own work.

Promotional Items

Consider the return on investment before paying for any promotional items. Leaflets and post cards for use as book marks can be produced reasonably cheaply.

By

Ghosts in the Desert from Indigo Dreams Publishing

Ghosts in the Desert from Indigo Dreams Publishing

 

 

Emma Lee’s “Ghosts is the Desert” is available for pre-order from Indigo Dreams Publishing and the launch will be held on Saturday 4 July in Leicester. Her previous collections “Mimicking a Snowdrop” and “Yellow Torchlight and the Blues” are still available.

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