Poet Voice

Poet voice is loosely defined as when a poet adopts a lilting cadence, mostly end lines on down-notes and introduce pauses within sentences where they aren’t necessary. The affect is that, to listeners, the poet’s voice is flattened so listeners can’t use the poet’s rhythm and tone to identify the more dramatic parts of the poem and the poem loses its musicality. Frequently it turns audiences off because it makes the poems harder to hear.

How can poets avoid using poet voice?

  • Don’t copy other poets. Do go to readings for inspiration and to listen to how other poets deliver their poems, but think about what made a good reading, what made a boring reading and what elements are worth adapting for you.
  • Focus on each individual poem and what story it tells or what emotions it evokes or which images you particularly want to draw attention to. How will you convey this for each poem you read?
  • Select your poems carefully: if you use a humorous poem after a few serious ones, you will change the tone and rhythm of your reading. Intersperse some newer poems amongst a group of themed poems.
  • Don’t put up barriers between you and your audience. You may be up on stage, but your audience want to feel engaged rather than patronised. They want you to succeed by using your voice to invite them on stage with you (not literally, but by treating them as friends rather than patronising them).
  • Does it help you to think you are performing your poems or reading them? For some, adopting a persona and performing each poem helps when giving a poetry reading. For others, focusing on reading the poems and not trying to perform eases that self-conscious feeling when reading to a group. Know which works for you and make it work for your audience.
  • Avoid comparing yourself to or trying to sound like other poets. Your comparison should be the last reading you did and making improvements for the next. There’s little point in putting all that effort into creating a unique voice for your poem and then flattening it with poet voice.
  • Always rehearse before a reading, even if speaking aloud is part of your writing process. Rehearsals force you to think about the pace of the reading both for individual poems and as a whole, you have to think about where you’re going to pause to breathe and for effect and the order of the poems you’re reading. How are you going to hold your interest? If you can’t, your audience will get bored too.

Our City or An Attempt at Exhausting a Place in Leicestershire.

Call for submissions in a book about Leicestershire

Editor: Jon Wilkins
Publishers: Dahlia
Deadline for abstracts: 31 January 2019

It’s so strange how words affect us. I was reading my favourite Francophile crime writer, Cara Black’s latest paperback, “Murder in Saint Germain”. Her hero Aimee Leduc scoots around Paris solving crimes. Paris is the key, the second most important character in her books, but I digress. As background in the story, Aimee’s partner Rene, mentioned Georges Perec and his writing. Apparently, Perec spent three days in St Sulphice, Paris, watching and recording. From that came “An Attempt at Exhausting a Place in Paris” which is an amazing piece of work. Which is where you come in I would like to invite Leicester related topics to appear in “Our City or An Attempt at Exhausting a Place in Leicestershire” They can be pieces on:

* The City
* The County
* The People
* Places
* Ideas
* Past
* Future
* Fantasy
* Social history
* Sport
* Food

Or anything else you can think of. It can be a ghost story set in the city, a short story about your love of Leicester City FC, a poem about one of the green spaces, there are no hard and fast rules, but it must be PASSIONATE about Leicester or Leicestershire. It should show your LOVE of the city, so I invite submissions from writers in any of the following forms:

* Fiction 2,000-4,000 words
* Poetry 50 lines maximum
* Short Story 2,000-4,000 words
* Flash fiction 100-500 words
* Creative non-fiction 2,000-4,000 words
* Essay 2,000-4,000 words

Contributions in your native tongue are welcome alongside a translation.

* There is NO publication fee. Each contributor will be provided two complimentary copies of “Our City or An Attempt at Exhausting a Place in Leicestershire” in 2019.
* You retain the copyright in your Contribution.
Please send completed submissions, along with a short bio-sketch to leicesterstories@btinternet.com You will be given the opportunity to read your work at the launch event in October 2019.

Deadline for abstracts: 31 January, 2019.

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