Journeys in Translation 30 September 2017 write-up

The event had a simple plan: have a poem read in English and then the same poem read/performed in translation. There were 14 poems and 14 translations which would be included on posters displayed at the event. In addition display books would show further translations for audience members to browse through. We hit two problems before the event started: the venue couldn’t find a working microphone (which had been booked in advance) and a working replacement couldn’t be found even after an hour, and one of the translators didn’t turn up without sending apologies or giving a warning. Fortunately, one of the poets was able to provide a working microphone which we were able to use on the night. However, the German translator’s absence was still a problem. Had the microphone problem been resolved sooner (or a working microphone provided in the first place), I might have had chance to ask another translator to read in place of the absent translator.

We had an audience of at least 40. I gave an introduction explaining that “Over Land, Over Sea: poems for those seeking refuge” had only sought poems in English, a language common to all three co-editors, because we’d prioritised raising funds and wanted the anthology to be published quickly. It is currently on its third edition. At last year’s Everybody’s Reading, we’d selected 8 poems and printed them as postcards which were given out at Leicester Railway Station. These proved so popular, we ran out of postcards by the fourth day. This year, we decided to build on the success of the postcards and invite translators to translate some of the poems. To keep the project manageable, we started with 12 poems which have expanded to 14 and tonight we were going to have readings of the poems in English and one translation (there were 101 poems in “Over Land, Over Sea: poems for those seeking refuge”.)

Journeys in Translation Event during Everybodys ReadingRod Duncan read his poem “but one country” and the Shona translation was read by Ambrose Musiyiwa.

Malka Al-Haddad read her poem “Children of War” in English and I read Dania Schüürmann’s German translation. Luckily I’d brought the display books so was able to read Dania’s translation from the book and got chance to rehearse it in my head while the first two poems were read. My written German is reasonable, but my spoken German is very rusty.

Chrys Salt read “The Insurrection of Poetry” and a University of Leicester PhD student from Syria (who doesn’t wish to be named) kindly read Ghareeb Iskander’s Arabic translation. Ghareeb hadn’t been able to attend and two people translating a poem into the same language would still use different phrases or words so reading someone’s else’s translation is not straightforward.

I read Lydia Towsey’s poem “Come In” and Giacomo Savani read his Italian translation.

Pam Thompson read “Dislocation” and Elvire Roberts performed her British Sign Language translation.

Marilyn Ricci read “Framed” and Ambrose Musiyiwa read his Shona translation.

Carol Leeming read “Song for Guests” and Malka Al-Haddad read her Arabic translation.

Unfortunately, as I was acting as master of ceremonies, I didn’t have chance to also read through my German translation of my poem, “Stories from ‘The Jungle’”, so had to make the decision to drop it. In hindsight, I wish I’d at least read one stanza of the translation.

I read Siobhan Logan’s “The Humans are Coming” and Antonella Delmestri read her Italian translation.

Ambrose Musiyiwa read his “The Man Who Ran Through the Tunnel” in English and Malka Al-Haddad read her Arabic translation.

I read Liz Byfield’s “Through the Lens” and Giacomo Savani read his Italian translation.

Kathleen Bell read “Waiting” and Ambrose Musiyiwa read his Shona translation.

I read Penny Jones’s “What’s in a Name?” and Antonella Delmestri read her Italian translation.

Trevor Wright read “Yalla” and Elvire Roberts performed her British Sign Language translation.

After the readings, we rearranged the chairs into a circle and had a discussion about translation, including whether multilingual people find that using a different language offers different perspectives or logic, why some bilingual writers only write in one language and don’t translate their own work into their other language, whether rhyme and rhythm can be translated into sign language, how translating different writers in a relatively short space of time prompted one translator to think about different approaches taken to writing the poems and the careful reading required to translate made one translator think about the poems she was translating and made her realise that the stories being told by refugees weren’t so different from her own story and how any of the refugees could have been her.

For more information about Journeys in Translation, see the Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/316952552020172/


Leicester Writers Club Everybodys Reading event flyer

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Journeys In Translation Leicester 30 September 2017

Journeys in Translation Event during Everybodys Reading“If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart.” Nelson Mandela

With the Journeys in Translation event on the horizon, I’ve been thinking a lot about translation and in particular the challenges in translating poems. Journeys in Translation took 13 poems from “Over Land, Over Sea: poems for those seeking refuge” and via a Facebook Group and local call-outs asked people with knowledge of one or more languages than English to translate one poem into another language. Some translators were happy to translate more than one poem. So far the poems have been translated into 22 different languages, Arabic, Assmanese, Bengali, British Sign Language, Chinese, Danish, Farsi, Filipino, Finnish, French, Gaelic (Irish), German, Greek, Hindi, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Shona, Spanish, Turkish and Welsh. Not all poems have been translated into all 22 languages, but every poem has an Italian, German and Portuguese translation. At the Journeys in Translation event, the original poem will be read along with one translation. There will be displays of posters featuring original poems and translations.

One translator commented that usually she translates into English rather than from English (her mother tongue) which put her outside of her comfort zone. She felt this led her to understand the frustration of not being able to instantly find the words she needed which gave her a “sense of powerlessness through loss of communication tools”. This prompted her to think about refugees trying to describe the lives they’d left behind, particularly where equivalent words aren’t available, and the further loss this creates. However, the close reading needed to translate a poem prompted her to think about the human aspect of the refugee crisis and how normal and comparable the refugee’s stories were.

There were examples of words for which there was no equivalent in the target language. For instance, apples are not native to Bengali so there is no word for ‘apple’, which led to a discussion about whether to leave the English word in the poem or use a Bengali word for another fruit, e.g. pomegranate instead. Did the original poet intend the focus of the line which was being translated to centre on the apple or on the act of a brother and sister sharing food? Would losing the word ‘apple’ create any loss of cultural significance? In the Biblical story, apple was the fruit that Eve ate so, in some contexts, an apple isn’t simply something to eat. In Shona, there is no direct word for astronaut, which presents a challenge when translating a poem about a girl who wants to be an astronaut.

Some poems presented other challenges. “but one country” is a speculum or verbal mirror image poem and some translators deliberately chose it to see if they were up to the challenge of recreating the form. Some translators altered the title from “but one country” to “only one country” which is more grammatical but ignores the way the original title makes the reader sit up and think because it’s not the expected word order. Translating the poem is not as straightforward as translating one line and moving on to the next, because each line has to work in both stanzas. The shape offers an additional test because the lines have to fit into their place in the poem’s shape otherwise the shape is distorted. In some translations, the original globe shape became more like a mountain looking at its reflection.

Some translators stuck to literal translations but others wanted to try and use the rhymes, internal rhymes and other sound patterns from the original poems into the translations. Occasionally that meant substituting alliteration and assonance in one place with alliteration and assonance in another.

Colloquialisms presented another challenge – did the translator use plain language as in the original or try and poeticise the language to make the translation look more like a poem? Metaphors need care in translation. Even though tigers don’t make dens (they take over a cave or hollow or smiliar natural shelter), one translation used “den” rather than “cave” to sustain an animal metaphor. The English sense of “alien” for “other” frequently doesn’t have a direct equivalent in other languages. In prose, there is space to offer an explanatory translation rather than a direct one, but poems don’t offer that space. However there were also benefits when translating some words: the Spanish word for ‘waiting’ includes the concept of hope, which enhances its context in the title of the poem “Waiting”.

After the Journeys in Translation event, there are plans to display all the translations on a blog.


Leicester Writers Showcase Ella @ 100

Leicester Writers Club Everybodys Reading event flyer

How to be a Successful Poet on Social Media

  • When was the last time you shared someone else’s status update/tweet/blog link on social media?
  • When was the last time you shared a link to your blog?
  • When did you last review or mention another writer’s book?
  • When was yours reviewed and who by? Have you ever reviewed a book by your reviewer?
  • When you had a poem published, did you help promote the magazine that published it or did you state you had a poem published without mentioning the magazine or linking to it?
  • When an editor sends you proofs of an accepted poem, do you only correct typos, spelling/grammar errors or do you see it as an opportunity to re-write your poem?
  • At open mic slots, do you keep within your allotted time or regularly overrun?
  • If invited to an event, do you turn up on time or do you have a reputation for always being late or frequently not turning up at all?
  • At a workshop, do you stay silent when other attendees are discussing and giving feedback on poems brought to/written at the workshop or do you join in?
  • When your poem is being discussed, do you expect unconditional praise or listen to the feedback with the aim of taking it away and assessing it later?
  • When you blog about the workshop, do you do a diary-style ‘I went to this workshop’ entry or do you share lessons or techniques learnt at the workshop?
  • When submitting poems to magazines, do you assume a standard submission format will do or do you check the guidelines given by the magazine?
  • Was your last post/status update about you or someone else?

We all slip up sometimes: the odd, unintended simultaneous submission, too tired to double-check guidelines after a long day, public transport failures meant we were running late and we irritably said something out of turn or reacted without thinking through the consequences. But only sometimes.

When you start out as a poet, it may feel as if you don’t have much to give. You want advice from other poets, feel you need all the feedback you can get, want the practice from open mic slots, feel you need to know how to get established.

But you are not a gawping drain of need. Behaving like one may get you immediate attention, but that will soon fade and isn’t a viable long term strategy.

You can give by listening and watching other poets, read work by others, share news and blog posts, help promote the magazines you want to be published in, promote the readings you want to be invited to take part in, even write reviews (two sentences on a bookseller’s site is better than silence).

Poet A getting an acceptance was not the reason for your rejection.
Poet B got the last open mic slot by patiently waiting their turn instead of trying to queue jump.
Poet C gets plenty of shares for her blog post because it wasn’t about her, but shared useful, practical information.
Poet D always gets an audience because she puts everyone at ease and makes them feel welcome.
Poet E got a mountain of incisive workshop comments because she took the time to feedback on everyone else’s poems.
Poet F got her book reviewed because she asked the reviewer before sending the book, instead of sending an unsolicited free copy and demanding a review in return.

Social media is for sharing, what did you share today?

Discussions: Poems in Translation

A friend bought a English translation of a poem originally written in Shona by Tavengwa Kaponda along to a workshop. This sparked several discussions that couldn’t be crammed into the space the workshop had.

There’s a school of thought that maintains translations should only be carried out by those fluent in both languages. But that ignores the fact that not all linguists are interested in poetry and not all poets have the time or motivation to become fluent in at least a second language. A German teenager may want to find out what her favourite band are singing or watch her favourite US TV show in English rather than badly dubbed into German. Whereas her British counterpart has no such incentive and languages aren’t treated as a priority in English schools. The Poetry Translation Centre pairs a British poet (who may not have any knowledge of the poem’s original language) with a translator fluent in both English and the original language. The translator provides a literal translation of the original poem and gives feedback on the translated poem so the British poet can be confident they’ve not strayed from the intentions in the original.

There are also two basic approaches to translating a poem. The translator can either work from a literal translation and try to reshape it into the original line lengths or sound patternings in the original. Or a translator can start with the sound patternings and rhythms and write a new poem loosely based on the literal translation, focusing on capturing the spirit of the original rather than the precision of the translation. Both approaches are valid.

There are additional complications when two languages do not have the same roots and also different cultural backgrounds. Some words don’t have an English cultural equivalent so are only translatable by providing an explanation rather than a short phrase. That can be done in prose but is difficult in poetry.

My workshop friend is fluent in both English and Shona so had no need to rely on a translator. However, a discussion about the difficulty of translating “nhemamsasa” from Shona into English became an introduction for others to have a go at translating the poem. Here I ran into two barriers 1) I have no knowledge of Shona and 2) online dictionaries are incomplete so, whilst they could give me an idea of what the original poem was saying, they couldn’t provide a literal translation. I did however have the workshop discussion and my friend’s translation so could combine Ambrose Musiyiwa’s translation, my snippets of literal translation and trying to keep the original structure.

The original poem:

Gwenyambira angakande mbira
.          mudziva otya kusara nechitima chechimanjemanje
.          Mutinhimra nhemamsasa mutasvi wenguva
.          anowana wakamumirira
pachiteshi paanodzikira

Tavengwa Kaponda

My translation:

The player might throw his mbira
.           in the river. Fearful he’ll miss the train, his heart beats
.           an inherited, ancestral tempo, rides through time,
.           where finds the mbira rhythm in wait
at the station when he gets off.

Translation will always be a compromise between what the original poet is saying and how they intended to say it. However, not translating leads to insularity. Reading only sonnets encourages the view that sonnets are the only poems worth bothering with, so, although translating is problematic, it is still worthwhile. No matter which individual languages we speak or don’t speak, they pale against the universal desire to communicate and connect. Mary Ruefle suggests the first translation “was when a mother heard her baby babble or cry, and had to decide in an instant what it meant.”

 


Haiku Competition – free entry:

Winner will receive a £100 Amazon voucher. Here are the entry details:

– The haiku has to follow the 5/7/5 syllable structure

– It has to be family friendly

– Only one entry per person

– It’s free to enter and open to all

– By entering, you retain full copyright but give us a non exclusive license to publish it on our site (as we’d like to publish some of the best entries)

The full rules and details are here: http://design.printexpress.co.uk/the-print-express-haiku-competition/

“Refractions” Kevin Morris ebook – poetry review

Refractions by [MORRIS, K.]Kevin Morris writes from familiar, everyday situations in rhyme-led, usually short verses, e.g. in “Dog and Ball” which ends,

“My introspection.
How can I suffer dejection
When I recollect your playful snort
And the ball you caught?”

He poses questions about his readers, in “Composed More or Less in Real-time While Sitting in a Liverpool Garden”

“The wind has dropped now,
And I wonder how
My poem will be understood
By those who would
Try
To find meaning in words that erratically fly
From one who sits listening to a barking dog, who cares not
A jot
For what
I have to say
On this sunny, wind swept day.”

Does Kevin Morris have something to say? There is a small group of poems which touch on the subject of prostitution provoked by a newspaper article that argues that sex workers should not be criminalised but those who pay for the services offered should be. “Waltz” offers a metaphor and less direct approach,

“It takes a couple to waltz.
With beauty charming
And character disarming,
She does dance
And romance
Until the sun’s rays lance
The comforting dark
And a new day starts.

Both parties are willing;
But does the payment of a shilling
To the girl
Who does so seductively twirl
Render their interaction
An exploitative transaction
And the waltz false?”

Ignoring that schillings are no longer legal tender in the UK, the poet’s approach takes the simplistic view that if someone freely chooses to go into sex work, then it shouldn’t be criminalised. At face value, this is a position that can’t be argued against. However, it does not take into account that not all sex workers freely choose their line of work. It conveniently ignores the problems of trafficking, the influence of drugs, including alcohol, and desperation that means that sex work isn’t a choice made without influence from other factors. Kevin Morris lends what he sees as a business transaction – a man buys a service from a woman – a romantic view that is misplaced.

Elsewhere, he acknowledges all lives come to an end eventually. In “Corridor”

“A door must open
And a word be spoken
To the figure from the gloom
Who vanishes soon.

Things remain
The same.
The empty corridor
And sadness reigning evermore.”

To lighten the load, there are a set of limericks. I confess to not being a fan of limericks so I will quote one as a taster, “There Was a Young Lady Called Suzie”

“There was a young lady called Suzie
Who said, ‘I am extremely choosy
About the men I date,
But it is getting late
And I am very boozy!’

“Refractions” is an ebook available from Amazon.

My review of K Morris’ Lost in the Labyrinth of My Mind is here.

Posted in Book review. Tags: . 2 Comments »

Leicester Poetry News

I’ve been caught up in typesetting “Welcome to Leicester” so I’m listing poetry related events taking place in Leicester during September and the beginning of October.

9 September 6 – 8pm Sanctuary Radio

Co-editor Ambrose Musiyiwa and I were interviewed by Marilyn Ricci for Sanctuary Radio’s book club programme and this will be broadcast on Friday 9 September between 6 – 8pm at www.sanctuaryradio.co.uk. We talk about “Over Land Over Sea: poems for those seeking refuge” (Five Leaves, 2015) and “Welcome to Leicester” (Dahlia Publishing, October 2016).

17 September 2pm South Leicestershire Poetry Stanza

Meet at Leicester Language Academy on New Walk. Friendly workshop.

19 September 7.30pm Shindig

Western Pub, Western Road, Leicester. Featuring readings from Alison Brakenbury, Shruti Chauhan and Lydia Towsey.

25 September 2.30pm Enchanter

Film poem with live music accompliment at Phoenix Arts. Seating is limited.

1 October Journeys Poems Pop-up Library at Leicester Railway Station

October sees the Everybody’s Reading Festival in Leicester which runs from 1 – 9 October. During the Festival there will be a pop-up library at Leicester Railway Station featuring poems from “Over Land Over Sea: poems for those seeking refuge” available as postcards for communters to take away.

3 October 7pm You Are Here Poetry Workshop led by Maria Taylor

Friends Meeting House, Queens Road, Leicester. Booking essential – see brochure. Workshop will look at generating new poems based on memory, places and how abstract emotions can be turned into raw material for poetry along with opportunities to read and learn from poets who write on these themes. Maria has a new pamphlet forthcoming from Happenstance and is Under the Radar’s Reviews Editor.

4 October 2pm Central Library Deborah Tyler-Bennett

Bishop Street, Leicester. Deborah Tyler-Bennett reads from her recent collection, “Napoleon Solo Biscuits,” a volume full of icons from popular culture, from the “Man from UNCLE” to Private Walker in “Dad’s Army” … The reading will be followed by Q and A about writing using popular figures.

4 October 8pm Word! with Malika Booker

Y Theatre, East Street, Leicester £7/£4. Open mic sessions available (arrive at 7pm to book).

5 October 7.30pm Gobsmacked

Upstairs at The Western, Western Road, Leicester £8/£6 booking recommended. Brand new show from performance poet and psychiatric nurse Rob Gee. From the bus driver who gets kidnapped by his own alter ego to the hazards of goalkeeping on tranquillisers, Gobsmacked explores the world of chaos and adventure that lurks behind the veneer of everyday life.

6 October 7pm Leicester Writers’ Club presents Writers breaking out of the Box

At Phoenix Arts, Midland Street, Leicester. £5 for non-members. Finding the words to tell our own stories is always a feat. It can be a game we enjoy playing. Authors from Leicester Writers’ Club discuss how they work creatively with various challenges such as dyslexia, English as a second language or visual impairment. Hear how their stories turn out and join in a Q & A. Guests are most welcome. Light refreshments will be available.

7 October 10am Poetry for Beginners with Karen Powell

Hamilton Library, Maidenwell Avenue, Hamilton, Leicester. Free but booking required – see brochure. No experience necessary, this workshop will show beginners short writing exercises to turn ideas into poems-in-progress and will explore poetic techniques and forms.

7 October 7pm Launch of “Welcome to Leicester”

At the African Caribbean Centre, Maidstone Road, Leicester. Event for the Welcome to
Leicester anthology to be published by Dahlia Publishing featuring readings from the anthology. Poems have been submitted by writers who want to share stories about Leicester to tie in with National Poetry Day’s theme of messages. We will be encouraging you to read the poems alongside the performances so sharing stories about a familiar area and encouraging you to discover more about your neighbourhood.

8 October New Walk Museum

Day of writing-related events at New Walk Museum, including ‘Walls’ and poetry and rap.

8 October 7.30pm Burning Eye Books

Upstairs at the Western, Western Road, Leicester. £8/£6. Burning Eye Books Presents: Ash Dickinson, Lydia Towsey and Andrew ‘Mulletproof’ Graves join us for a scintillating evening of high quality spoken word, comedy and entertainment.

8 October 7.30pm Under Milk Wood

The Guildhall, Guildhall Lane, Leicester. Free, booking essential – see brochure. Performed by Stage Left Theatre Workshop.

9 October John Hegley

at the Guildhall for two events, one child-friendly starting at 4pm and one evening event starting at 7pm.

Throughout the Festival, the Exchange Bar is offering a free cup of tea for a handwritten poem.

The full Everybody’s Reading Festival brochure is available at: http://www.everybodysreading.co.uk/

Posted in culture. Tags: , . 1 Comment »

Resident Poetry Night, Leicester Writes @ Bru

Hamza Bodhaniya from Bru gave a brief welcome and said the cafe were happy to support literature events. Farhana Shaikh, of Dahlia Publishing, talked about the poetry commission she had organised where the commissioned poet was to write a sequence of five poems inspired by a residency at Bru that would be published and performed during the Leicester Writes Festival. She had been very impressed by the quality of applications and had been pleased to announce Jayne Stanton as Bru’s resident poet.

The cafe, however, is a noisy venue: customer chatter and kitchen noise drifted from downstairs and background music (presumably to muffle/mask crockery and cutlery clatter) was turned down but still audible. Bru is also all hard surfaces with no carpet or soft wallpaper to absorb sounds, noise echoes and rebounds. So a microphone was necessary for performers and the audience have to work at listening.

Jayne explained her poems had arisen from a combination of observations whilst visiting Bru and some online research. She’d focused on the area from the Railway Station and the Clocktower, because the most direct route takes you past Bru. Her first poem, “Time Traveller” was based on the statue of Thomas Cook by the station. “No Fixed Abode” mentions homelessness in the city and how these problems aren’t simply solved by opening empty houses. Some of the characters she met near Bru provided inspiration, one being Maria who sold copies of “The Big Issue” which provided the poem with its title. “Money Talks” looks at the changes in Gallowtree Gate, one of the main shopping areas, particularly after Highcross shopping mall opened. Her fifth residency poem, “Street” was inspired by watching people in Granby Street outside Bru where “a balloon holds its breath.” Then Leicester City Football Club won the premiership so Jayne was asked to write a bonus poem capturing the mood of the city. “The Art of Winning” was inspired by Elizabeth Bishop’s “The Art of Losing”.

Rhetoric Literary Society took to the stage starting with the Guy in the Green Beret, aka Boston ‘The Orator’ Williams who was too shy to give his name this evening, who read “Common Practice” where “words swarm and worm their way into structure” and “Oh Ye Purveyor of Fine Lies” after the audience suggested the EU Referendum as a theme. He confessed to struggling to concentrate when one of his favourite songs was played as background music. “Mind Time” asked “why can’t we enjoy the present for a bit?” which was followed by a satire on the stop and search practices which profile potential offenders based on lazy, racist stereotyping, and ended with the line “I killed the stereotype/ and I dare you to take me away.”

DTP Haughton began with “Rae Town” about whether the place where he was born would remember and honour him in due course, “Am I not Jamaican enough? A little too English?/ I wonder if my name will be remembered.” “Rae Town” was followed by “Too Red”, “Perfect Teeth” – self-deprecatingly “I never had perfect teeth…” so perhaps he is a “little too English”. DTP finished with a poem about keeping up with the Joneses which might be titled “Badges”.

A open mic session rounded off the evening. Jayne Stanton’s calm, measured delivery contrasted with the enthusiastic energy of the Rhetoric Literary Society but all read quality poems that were prepared to look at their subjects with compassion and acute observation.